Lost Audio

THE SEARCH FOR WILLIE NILE

Here's another unedited excerpt of WUSB people trying to get a legal ID from a musical star. In this case, it was Willie Nile, who was performing on the Stony Brook campus on Friday, October 3, 1980. We spent a good deal of time searching the Union building to track him down. (At one point you'll hear me mention that I hadn't even started to work on "Planet Three" yet, that being the audio collage program I was producing at the time on Friday nights.) In the end, we got the ID and another Stony Brook concert was history.

LEGAL IDS FROM THE CLASH

On April 26, 1984, The Clash came to Stony Brook (in their second incarnation) and, while we couldn't get an interview, a bunch of us at WUSB got them to record an ID for us. This is only a couple of minutes long, but it captures the thrill involved when people from a college radio station interact with superstars for a brief moment. It's pretty funny how Paul Simonon just couldn't get "Stony Brook" right and Joe Strummer had serious doubts that we were "the most dangerous station in the nation." They were both super nice to us and wound up putting on a great show.

 

TRANSMITTER TEST - SEPTEMBER 5, 1995

Another Tuesday evening edition of "Transmitter Test," this one recorded on September 5, 1995. Again, we admonished anyone still listening and also gave an explanation of the chaos that ensued last week. The station was now broadcasting from a new antenna site (resulting in some static in the background). WUSB's Scott and Rob joined the conversation and we discussed why the new transmitter site was called Bald Hill. Listeners were instructed not to call in and so we got phone calls. Conversation included everything from Greek salads to advertising jingles and comics.

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - ONE-SIDED RADIO - APRIL 1987

This one is a bit weird. On the morning of April 28, 1987, I was in my hotel room in Frobisher Bay (now called Iqaluit) on Baffin Island when the phone rang. It was my Tuesday morning radio show back home on WUSB. Since I couldn't be there that week, guest host Chris Crowley called me and I did my best to describe where I had been for the past week. Thing is, this is not the recording as it went out over the air since that was never recorded. This was the recording I made on my end, so you only hear my responses to the questions being asked over the phone. And even that is incomplete because my tape recorder started malfunctioning a few minutes after I began. Definitely not the best radio moment, but a memory nonetheless.

 

MIDWEST TOUR PART 1 - FEBRUARY 1990

This was the first chapter of my Midwest tour, which took place starting February 3, 1990. In the first leg, I was driving from Stony Brook to Syracuse to visit a friend. On the way, I encountered some super-hazardous icy weather. The sound quality here is really terrible, but it brings back some fun memories for me. For you, it might prove torturous.

 

PLANET THREE - JANUARY 24, 1981

One of my favorite series was the mysterious "Planet Three," a three-hour concoction of audio clips, music, and overall weirdness. I had inherited the Friday night/Saturday morning midnight to 3 am slot in the autumn of 1980 after another show that had occupied that slot ended. (It was called "The Better Than Dead Air Show" which was a fun program I was involved in with a couple of other people at WUSB. No recordings are known to exist.) Sadly, there are only two surviving excerpts from "Planet Three" and this is the first, broadcast on January 24, 1981, one week before the series finale. The trademark of this show was that I never spoke a word except for an ID that aired at the end and occasionally some backwards speech that revealed the name of the program.

This episode featured the sounds of Republicans as they were starting to take over the country, along with some memories from the 1960s. (One of the musical bits played here would eventually become the theme to another series called "Chatterbox," available in our archives.)

(There's even a bit where some prank calls (possibly live) were broadcast. Technically, they weren't calls since our local crossbar switch had a bug in it that occasionally allowed people to get connected together just by picking up the phone at the same time. You can hear the confusion as something like that was transpiring along with feedback that we were somehow causing.)

 

STEPHEN DUNIFER INTERVIEW - AUGUST 1995

In early August of 1995, I did an interview with Stephen Dunifer, the founder and chief engineer of Free Radio Berkeley, an unlicensed FM radio station in Berkeley, California. He was super knowledgeable about radio and how to do it right. At the time, his station had quite a following in the Bay Area, but he was clear that he didn't want to cover a larger region. This is where I first became acquainted with the concept of low power community radio. In a few years, low power FM (LPFM) would be a legal option for new broadcasters.

 

WUSB 10TH ANNIVERSARY INTERVIEW: STEVE KREITZER (MARCH 1987)

I did a series of interviews with WUSB people as part of the station's tenth anniversary. This unedited interview with WUSB's Steve Kreitzer was conducted while driving in a car on the way to New York City in March of 1987. We talk about Steve's first days at the station, including his first show in December 1980, as well as the ill-fated Bob Marley concert at Stony Brook. We also reminisced about broadcasting basketball games with WUSB's Ray Stallone and an on-air prank that involving charging elephants.

 

AIRCHECK - OCTOBER 27, 1981

Here's an aircheck from a Tuesday evening music show I did on October 27, 1981. Airchecks are generally of lower quality and only capture the part of the show that was in progress when the microphone switch was turned on. This was a pretty typical Tuesday evening show.

 

TRANSMITTER TEST - AUGUST 29, 1995

The second edition of "Transmitter Test" aired on August 29, 1995 and started to turn into an actual program. The show's intro incorporated voices from a number of WUSB personalities. We still were telling people not to listen for the entire hour, but we now at least were having conversations. This was the first show where I used the name Emmanuel on WUSB. This hour was spent talking with WUSB's Brother Nick "off-air" while the transmitter was being tested. Not being on the air allowed us to be more honest and I finally revealed the actual reason I stopped doing "Brain Damage."

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - INTERVIEW WITH CABLE TV LICENSEE - APRIL 1987

Back in Frobisher Bay (Iqaluit) on Baffin Island in April 1987, I did an interview with the local cable TV licensee, who also had opened the first video store in the area. This was a really enlightening discussion that revealed how the programming was received, what was involved in making it all legal, and what types of stations were carried. While hearing how things used to work is really fascinating, it's even more so when people back then start to reminisce about how it used to be even earlier.

 

1984 ALTERNATIVE PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION NEWS PIECE (1988)

This is a news feature on 1984's Alternative Presidential Convention that was produced in March 1988 by WUSB's Dave Goodman. (This was actually left for me as an answering machine message which is why it sounds like a phone call.)

 

GORBACHEV IN NEW YORK - DECEMBER 7, 1988

Every so often, something momentous would happen in New York City and I'd feel compelled to take the train into town with a tape recorder to cover it. On December 7, 1988, Mikhail Gorbachev made an historic trip to the city as part of a visit to the United Nations. I spent much of that afternoon trying to track him and his wife Raisa down in various parts of town, including outside the Soviet Mission. What was amazing here - and at so many other events - was how none of the other reporters on the scene really knew just what was going on. It was a fun experience overall, some of which aired on the December 10, 1988 edition of "Brain Damage" (available in our archives).

 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON SHOW - NOVEMBER 29, 1985

This is the last excerpt of one of my Friday afternoon shows, broadcast on November 29, 1985. Apparently there had been a show the previous week, but no known recording of that exists. In this week's Stoneyhaven news, we hear about Thanksgiving and a story from years past. In the real world, there are updates on the aftermath of Hurricane Gloria and a bunch of local items, plus an attempt to find the Coca Cola bottling company in Osaka, Japan. (The end of the call is cut off, however.)

 

NEWS OF THE WORLD - MAY 18, 1989

It's the final known edition of "News of the World," this one airing over WBAI on May 18, 1989 at 1 pm, a full two years after its WUSB incarnation. I was now using Emmanuel Goldstein as my radio name and this would only be my third show on that station, following the "Off The Hook" pilot in 1988 and another edition of "News of the World" on March 13, 1989 (both of which are available in our archives).

This version of the program had a revised intro and an expanded length. As with the first episode on WBAI, this edition was done live. Unlike that broadcast, this one aired in the afternoon. An explanation of what the program was all about, along with a warning about possible controversial content and an explanation of shortwave are all included here. In this edition, we hear from Radio Austria, a  a feature that was sent to us on tape from a South African program called "Mirror on Africa," United Arab Emirates Radio, and the BBC World Service.

This was tied into a WBAI fundraiser and we offered copies of the shortwave listening guide "Passport to World Band Radio" as premiums. It got an enthusiastic response.

 

BIG AUDIO DYNAMITE INTERVIEW - MAY 1, 1987

Now here's an incredible piece of history, most of which has never been aired. On May 1st, 1987, I was lucky enough to be able to see Big Audio Dynamite at Irving Plaza in New York City. It was the day after I returned from my trip to Baffin Island so the contrast couldn't have been more dramatic. I was able to get backstage and have a brief interview with Don Letts and Dan Donovan from the band before the show. I don't know what it was, but we just clicked and were able to have some really good conversations about music, the world, life, etc. Don was particularly interested in my hacker connection and I got a great thrill seeing Mick Jones looking over a copy of 2600. I would realize over the years and during other times we hung out that these guys were so much more than a band; they were truly interesting people who had a fascinating world view and were a joy to talk to.

I was there with someone else from WUSB (whose name I completely forget and I feel awful about that) and we were able to secure legal IDs, not only from members of B.A.D., but also from Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys who happened to be backstage as well. But the way he talked to my colleague was awful and disgusting, which made that probably one of the worst IDs ever recorded by anyone. So, in a very brief period of time, we went from intelligence to idiocy. And that was the music scene.

 

TRANSMITTER TEST - AUGUST 22, 1995

Another forgotten series of mine was a short-lived show called "Transmitter Test," which aired at 6:00 pm on Tuesday evenings (that's right, the exact day and time that "Off The Wall" would one day occupy). It was my first show on WUSB since "Brain Damage" had come to an end that January. The first edition of this series, which aired on August 22, 1995, consisted mostly of low frequency music with occasional test messages along with other musical selections and public service announcements. The whole thing was preceded by a warning not to listen. The show was still finding its way.

 

WUSB "BREAK-IN" PIECE ON INCOMING REPUBLICANS - JANUARY 1981

This was something I had wanted to do since I was a kid and heard those Dickie Goodman "break-in" singles on the radio, you know, where a "reporter" would ask a question and the answer would come in a line from a hit song of the time. I put this one together with the help of WUSB's Bill Senikowich and Barry Aaronson right after Ronald Reagan took office in January of 1981.

 

WUSB TEST TRANSMISSION - JUNE 1977

This is a very short piece but a significant one. I was still a senior in high school and (as I often did) I was exploring the FM radio dial when I found a brand new station at 90.1FM. This was what was being broadcast on that day in early June 1977, a few weeks before WUSB in Stony Brook signed on as an FM station for the first time officially. Little did I know the life altering effect that place would have on me when I started attending college there several months later. (The voice on this broadcast is that of WUSB's Frank Burgert who, as of this writing, is still the station's chief engineer.)

 

INTERCOLLEGIATE BROADCASTING SYSTEM CONFERENCE REPORT - MARCH 1987

This was a produced piece that summed up the various recordings which came from the March 1987 Intercollegiate Broadcasting System (IBS) conference in New York City. It's not clear where (or even if) this piece aired, but it was the end result of all of the recordings of this event that I had made.

 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON SHOW - NOVEMBER 15, 1985

Another Friday afternoon show, featuring an update on the goings-on in the fictitious community of Stoneyhaven, Long Island. On this program, aired November 15, 1985, we had a special visit from my former Voice of Long Island co-host Mike Yuhas, who joined the fun by being interviewed as a local exterminator. The issue of the week in town was an explosion of house flies, no doubt something that was based on reality. I also tried to find the Coca Cola bottling company in Brazil as part of that weekly tradition.

 

THE WUSB WEATHER HOTLINE - JUNE 1987

This was a fun little project we ran from the radio station for a little while: the WUSB weather hotline. We discovered that the new campus Rolm phone system allowed a virtually unlimited number of people to call in to a prerecorded announcement, which would repeat indefinitely. This allowed us to set up our own weather hotline where we could share all kinds of other info. This particular recording was made in June 1987, shortly before WUSB's tenth anniversary, and was clearly recorded right on the street.

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - VISITING A HIGH SCHOOL CLASS - APRIL 1987

This is a brief excerpt from a high school computer class in Frobisher Bay (Iqaluit) on Baffin Island, recorded in April of 1987. I realize this may be like listening to paint dry for some of you, but there are a few interesting tidbits captured here. I was introduced as a special guest and got to answer a few questions about New York and life in the "south" from kids in a remote part of the north, as well as discuss the importance of computers and the challenges of life here.

 

NEWS OF THE WORLD - JUNE 2, 1987

Another episode of "News of the World," and the last WUSB version of that program that we could track down. In this edition, aired on Tuesday, June 2, 1987, we hear from Radio Moscow, Armed Forces Radio and Television Network, and a feature that was sent to us on tape from a South African program called "Africa South."

There's a little bit of room noise in the background. Also, the end of the previous show and the beginning of the next one are attached to this recording.

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - INTERVIEW WITH ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER - APRIL 1987

This is an interview I did with a teacher at the elementary school in Iqaluit (still referred to as Frobisher Bay at the time) on Baffin Island in the Northwest Territories (now part of Nunavut). We talk about how computers are important in such a remote place. Like we heard in the church service segment, kids were encouraged to be themselves, so there was a lot of background noise, but everyone was involved in a project and enthused by it. You can heat the interactions between the teacher and individual students. It was amazing to see how they were quickly mastering the technology. This was recorded in April 1987.

 

RADIO ART NOISE EXCERPT - SEPTEMBER 8, 1991

Now this was a bit of fun at WUSB that I really had very little to do with. Radio host Gary Pecorino and others put together a periodic experimental music presentation entitled "Radio Art Noise" that would go on for five hours with all kinds of weird sounds. This is a small portion of the second one that aired on Sunday, September 8, 1991 and you can hear my voice way in the background towards the beginning while other people are talking. This is the kind of thing that noncommercial radio is all about.

 

INTERCOLLEGIATE BROADCASTING SYSTEM PANEL - MARCH 1987

A good portion of a panel discussion on college radio that took place at the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System's March 1987 conference in New York City with WUSB general manager Norm Prusslin, music critic Wayne Robins, free form radio host Vin Scelsa from WXRK (K-ROCK), and WUSB program director Steve Miller. The discussion focuses on the importance of local radio and  what college radio stations shouldn't have to worry about.

 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON SHOW - NOVEMBER 8, 1985

A Friday afternoon show with an update from Stoneyhaven, this one recorded on November 8, 1985. I gave an update on the election results, talked about the Stoneyhaven train station and its uniqueness, and reported on a conflict with the arthritis club. Haley's Comet was in town and I tried to find the Coca Cola bottling company in Bombay.

 

RAMONES INTERVIEW - FEBRUARY 14, 1981

I'm so happy to have found this because people never believe you when you say you once interviewed The Ramones. This was recorded on February 14, 1981 with myself and WUSB's Bill Senikowich. Johnny and Joey were fun to talk to, not at all stressed about the concert they were about to perform at Stony Brook. They told us what it was like to work with Phil Spector, when recording for the new album would begin, how there's a different mentality in England, and the overall slowness of progress. They even recorded some IDs for us. And, of course, when we walked them over to the gym to set up, we were completely mobbed by fans. (It was never easy to hide if you were with Joey Ramone.)

 

AIRCHECK - DECEMBER 28, 1979

This is an aircheck from one of my first music shows that aired on Friday nights from 8 to 11pm. This one was broadcast on December 28, 1979. As it's an aircheck, it was recorded on a low quality tape machine that only turned on when the microphone was activated.

 

NEWS OF THE WORLD - JANUARY 27, 1987

It's another edition of "News of the World" which had become a regular series that aired on Tuesday nights at 8:30pm on WUSB. This was the first show of the series which aired on January 27, 1987, six months after the original pilot. In this episode, we hear an introduction to shortwave, as well as broadcasts from Radio Deutsche Welle (including the interval signal), Radio Moscow, the BBC World Service, Radio Sofia (including the interval signal), and a feature that was sent to us on tape from a West German program called "Germany Today."

 

THE MAKING OF A LAURIE ANDERSON PROMO (1982)

This was a bit of fun I had making a Laurie Anderson promo at WUSB with Mike Yuhas and Dave Goodman in June of 1982. That weird sound midway through, incidentally, is a bulk eraser, a scary device that could completely erase a tape with the push of a button.

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - CHURCH SERVICE, APRIL 26, 1987

Back on Baffin Island, I attended a unique church service on April 26, 1987 in Iqaluit. You hear everything from the church bells to the music to the lyrics of the psalms and the sermon in Inuktitut. What I found most remarkable was how the kids were able to just act like kids throughout, running up and down the aisles, playing, and making plenty of noise. Nobody minded or was in the least bit distracted. I'm not usually a churchgoer, but I found this really fascinating, enlightening, and pleasant.

 

ALTERNATIVE PRESIDENTIAL CONVENTION EXCERPTS - OCTOBER 6, 1984

Here is a small piece of a real bit of history. In 1984, I discovered that 209 people were running for president. I thought it would be fun to invite them all to the same place, that place being the Stony Brook campus where WUSB would broadcast whatever transpired. And so, on October 6, 1984, the Alternative Presidential Convention took place in the Stony Brook Union auditorium with more than two dozen candidates in attendance. We broadcast the whole thing for hours on that Saturday and held seminars with some of the candidates afterwards. The whole thing got a ton of media coverage from all around the world and what was particularly noteworthy was how civil everyone was, despite the huge differences between the platforms represented.

We managed to salvage excerpts totaling nearly 90 minutes from this event, which was moderated by Dave Goodman of WUSB. The candidates presented here include: William Allen Katz from San Antonio representing the Pan American Party; James Yager calling in from prison in Alabama; Bob Lamb from Carbon, Texas; former Hungarian diplomat Stephen Koczak; Grady O'Cummings from Brooklyn; Peter Swider from Michigan; Bobby Shofner from Las Vegas; Cyril E. Sagan of Pennsylvania; and Joseph W. Kelly from Texas.

 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON SHOW - NOVEMBER 1, 1985

It's another Friday afternoon show featuring the people of Stoneyhaven, this one from November 1, 1985. In this edition, the parallels between Halloween and Election Day were explored, focusing on the trick or treating escapades of one kid along with a particularly ugly election campaign season in the fictitious community. (The latter was probably inspired by that year's Suffolk County Legislator race between Steve Englebright and Helen Lefkowitz.)

One of my housemates bursts in later in the show and I make an attempt to find the phone number of the Coca Cola company in Madrid, causing a bit of confusion. The show had been preempted two weeks earlier, due to the airing of "Shadow Over Long Island" (available in our archives) and there was no news from Stoneyhaven the previous week due to my being in a strictly music mood.

 

WEEI INTERVIEW - JULY 19, 1985

On July 19, 1985, I appeared on the WEEI Evening Review with Rod Fritz to participate in a feature on hackers. WEEI was at 590AM in Boston. This broadcast took place right after the seizure of our computer bulletin board in New Jersey that summer and this show gave me the opportunity to try and get the word out about that. It didn't do much good, as on this very program an opinion piece by John Rodman repeated the very myths I was trying to dispel, namely that our BBS was somehow moving satellites in the sky. Also appearing on the show were computer security expert Jay BloomBecker and Dave Hackel from Arthur Andersen.

 

PROFESSOR ERNEST DUBE INTERVIEW - 1987

This interview with Stony Brook professor Ernest Dube, recorded in 1987, was an incredible experience. He was in the midst of a huge controversy as his tenure had been denied due to his criticism of Zionism in his Africana Studies classes. Rarely have I spoken to someone more knowledgeable and open about the topics they were involved in. I felt very small in his presence, but he was nothing but welcoming and gracious in his home in Manhattan. This guy was way ahead of his time and he had a lot of support from the student body, not that it did him much good in the end. We hear a lot of complaints about people getting "canceled" in university settings these days, but it's been going on for a long time for those who speak out against oppression or the status quo. He didn't deserve to have been treated the way he was.

I'm not certain if this was ever used for an article or a radio feature, but it's certainly worth hearing.

 

TUESDAY MORNING SHOW EXCERPT - SEPTEMBER 16, 1986

Here's the only surviving portion of one of my WUSB Tuesday morning shows, this episode from September 16, 1986. I really don't know how I was able to pull off this shift, as I'm most definitely not a morning person. I tried to get into the spirit though, with a whole Tuesday vibe added in. And, at least in this particular edition, I had a lot of fun trying to track down the KGB.

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - MORE LOCAL RADIO, APRIL 24, 1987

Back on Baffin Island, this is some local CBC Eastern Arctic radio (CFFB) in the Inuktitut language from early in the afternoon of April 24, 1987. Along with a call-in and music program, the CBC national and local news in English appears at 23 minutes in. This may not be everyone's cup of tea, but I found it strangely relaxing and couldn't stop listening when I was there. It would be incredible to get a translation of what was being talked about back then.

 

INTERCOLLEGIATE BROADCASTING SYSTEM INTERVIEWS #2 - MARCH 1987

Here are some more highlights from the March 1987 Intercollegiate Broadcasting System conference in New York City. Included here:

Interviews with a CBS Records college radio promoter, an IRS Records college radio promoter, a member of the band Street Angel, and an excerpt from the onsite "radio station" WIBS.

An interview with composer Frank De Vol.

An interview with an unknown promoter.

An interview with an unknown FCC guy.

Fun times.

 

THE SATURDAY NIGHT CIRCUS, 1978

Here are some more excerpts from WUSB's first call-in show, "The Saturday Night Circus," alternately hosted by Ed Goldberg and Paul Harris.

The first excerpt, dated January 14, 1978, features my friend Al calling in to Paul Harris using a weird accent and reviewing various people who died in 1977 (both Al and Paul say "1978" instead of "1977" several times).

The second excerpt, dated January 28, 1978, was a real milestone for me, as I joined the cast of the show (at least Ed Goldberg's version) and became the official newscaster, using the name Eric G. Corley. Ed gave me the opportunity to critique my own first newscast and chief engineer Frank Burgert puts in an appearance.

In the third excerpt, dated July 1, 1978, some sort of change had been implemented by Paul Harris that resulted in my not doing newscasts during the show anymore, a fact I mentioned during a call-in segment to Ed Goldberg where I didn't seem to know how to get off the phone. There was also a rumor that the show might be canceled soon (which the date of the next excerpt indicates didn't happen).

The final excerpt aired sometime in December of 1978 with Paul Harris calling in to Ed Goldberg from the WUSB holiday party where "Blind Lemon Jefferson" and the entire staff sing "We Wish You a Merry Christmas."

 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON SHOW - OCTOBER 11, 1985

In this Friday afternoon slot, aired on October 11, 1985, the news from Stoneyhaven focuses on one resident's ill-fated drive that resulted in his car breaking down on the approach to the Verrazzano Bridge. (This is based on a true story that had recently happened to me while I was attempting to visit my former "Voice of Long Island" co-host Mike Yuhas in Philadelphia.)

Only around a half hour of this week's show was recorded. Also, at the beginning you'll hear a promo for the radio play "Shadow Over Long Island" (available in our archives).

 

MORE EARLY NEWSCASTS ON WUSB (1978)

So after that disastrous newscast at the end of 1977, I decided to actually come back. I could only get better, after all. (I also modified my name from E.G. Corley to Eric G. Corley.) All three of these newscasts came on the heels of massive snowstorms. (You'll also hear a few seconds of another undated newscast at the very beginning.) But it was the second broadcast that was particularly momentous due to late breaking news of a fire in the Union building where the radio station was housed. We put together a live update and taped an interview with a student government staffperson, while exposing the fact that there weren't any fire extinguishers in the building other than in the radio station. And then we went on to focus on power failures on Long Island caused by the storm, interviewing Long Island Lighting Company spokesperson Jan Hickman, just like a professional radio station would! That newscast was a pivotal moment for me because it was the complete opposite of the previous year's disaster and it proved that in radio you could always have another chance. 

Other newscasters featured here are Howard Altman and Frank Burgert.

In order, the newscasts presented here are:

January 18, 1978 (early evening)

January 20, 1978 (special report)

February 8, 1978 (early evening)

 

THE NEGATIVLAND TELETOUR ON WUSB - 1988

In 1988, on a Wednesday morning at midnight, WUSB broadcast something known as the Negativland Teletour. I had absolutely nothing to do with this other than enthusiastically supporting its broadcast. The band would put together a unique program for each noncommercial station that called them. You'll hear a sound check with WUSB's Chris Crowley before material from luminaries like The Weatherman (along with a legal ID) and Crosley Bendix, including a negative review of the radio dial in northern California, "Nesbitt's Lime Soda," and "The Playboy Channel." Some WUSB programming follows, including a "Brain Damage" promo!

 

NEWS OF THE WORLD - JULY 22, 1986

"News of the World" was a series I put together as a celebration of shortwave radio and the many different voices that could be heard over that medium. This was the pilot episode, aired on Tuesday, July 22, 1986, and it features broadcasts from Kol Israel, Radio Prague (including the interval signal and famed broadcaster Hana), Radio Moscow (including the interval signal), and the Voice of Free China in Taiwan. (While this episode aired on WUSB, there were others that aired on WBAI. One of them is already in our "Off The Hook" archives for March 13, 1989, which was my second program on that station.)

 

1981 WUSB MUSICAL COLLAGE

This was a terrific WUSB custom in our early days. Various staffers would put together clips from songs and other releases, both old and new, and challenge listeners to name as many as they could. This would be timed to coincide with our anniversary on June 27th. This was one of the classics, released in 1981. See how many clips you can name!

 

DAY OF OUTRAGE - JANUARY 21, 1988

The second "Day of Outrage" took place on January 21, 1988 in Brooklyn. It was basically a crowd of protesters marching through the streets trying to disrupt subway service and making their presence known. Fighting back against racist attacks and closing crackhouses were a couple of the main reasons for the protest. My narration of the march's progress gives you a sense of the day. You might notice my voice getting somewhat sped up towards the end as my battery ran low (causing the recording speed to slow down and sound faster when played back at a normal speed). And while I'm in a bodega buying new batteries, you can hear a TV set playing back a live report from the very same demonstration! You can't get more New York than that. (Excerpts of this recording were aired on the January 30, 1988 edition of "Brain Damage," available in our archives.)

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - LOCAL RADIO, APRIL 24, 1987

We're back in the soon-to-be-renamed Frobisher Bay in what was then the Northwest Territories. When I visited that remarkable place, I was determined to capture as much as possible. So I recorded their local radio station (CFFB), part of the CBC Eastern Arctic service. What I stumbled upon late in the afternoon of April 24, 1987 is a perfect example of the value of local radio as a host named Curt Petrovich encouraged listeners to call in and do raven calls live on the air. The response was incredible as people - not only in this small city but in tiny communities all over northern Canada - seemed eager to show off their wildlife imitation skills. I only wish I had been able to record more of it. Also included are news and sports updates, as well as a local blizzard warning.

 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON SHOW - OCTOBER 4, 1985

It's another Friday afternoon show, this one from October 4, 1985, two weeks after the last one. (Hurricane Gloria had hit the previous Friday, making a show on that date impossible.) Both the actual show for the Long Island area and this week's Stoneyhaven story are focused on the aftermath of the historic hurricane.

(An interesting sidenote: the radio drama "Shadow Over Long Island" (available in our archives) had originally been scheduled for a repeat airing on this date after debuting the previous Sunday on both WUSB and WPKN in Bridgeport, Connecticut. Since airing a mock radio drama about a local nuclear meltdown immediately after a hurricane had hit the area seemed a tad irresponsible, we delayed everything by two weeks, which opened up this timeslot.)

 

SOME OF THE WORST NEWSCASTS OF ALL TIME (1977)

OK, prepare for some fun. These are my actual first times on the air as a staffperson, using the absurdly pretentious name of E.G. Corley. These newscasts all aired in December of 1977. They're either evening (5:42pm) or late night (11pm) casts. The evening ones tended to be taken more seriously. Late at night there was less supervision. On the 12/9 broadcast, you could tell I was trying not to laugh. The 12/15 news report gives the wrong date at the beginning, which was super confusing for us trying to get it right in the present. But the biggest catastrophe came on the last newscast of the year, when a story about the late Guy Lombardo proved to be too much. After that disaster, it didn't seem like there was much of a future in radio for me.

Other newscasters featured here are Howard Altman, Keith Namm, and Bob Benuhan.

In order, the newscasts presented here are:

December 2, 1977 (late night)

December 9, 1977 (late night)

December 14, 1977 (evening)

December 15, 1977 (evening)

December 16, 1977 (late night)

December 23, 1977 (late night)

December 28, 1977 (evening)

December 30, 1977 (late night)

 

SPYING ON THE CLEMSON FOOTBALL TEAM - AUTUMN 1986

In the autumn of 1986, I visited my friend Gregg at Clemson University in South Carolina and we recorded a bit that involved us sneaking around to get a glimpse of the revered Clemson football team. Supposedly even trying to watch them practice could get you into a heap of trouble so we couldn't resist. Bits of this were aired on my Tuesday morning show.

 

WUSB ELECTION DAY REPORT - NOVEMBER 5, 1985

This is an unedited report from November 5, 1985 on Election Day, as County Legislator Steve Englebright is reelected. Multiple takes as we tally the early returns in the race pitting Englebright against challenger Helen Lefkowitz, a race particularly marked by mudslinging. In an interview with Englebright, he gives his thoughts on the campaign, compares this night to the election returns of two years ago, and tells us what to look forward to in the next two years. He discusses the fight to keep the Shoreham nuclear plant from opening and the continuing challenge to protect the pine barrens and drinking water. We hear about what has been accomplished since 1983 and learn what the Ratepayers Against LILCO line is and what it stands for. This segment ends with a victory speech by Englebright.

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - RON MONGEAU INTERVIEW, APRIL 1987

We're back on Baffin Island in April 1987 interviewing a fascinating guy named Ron Mongeau about how Macintoshes were brought into this remote region and how they lent themselves to the Inuit culture. Ron was executive director of the Baffin Regional Council and he was really enthused about how people were skipping over the typewriter phase and going straight to computers. We learn what a syllabic language is, how Inuktitut fonts were developed, and what was involved in bringing computers into the region, as well as what the Inet 2000 system is and the creation of the first BBS.

 

JOHN LENNON SPECIAL - 1979

Back in 1979, a year before he was tragically taken from us, John Lennon was the focus of a special program hosted by myself and Gary Pecorino. This is one of my earlier non-news on-air endeavors and it aired at midnight. Apart from playing and analyzing the music, we read some excerpts from Lennon's writings, played bits of the Beatles Christmas records, and showed how a witty conversation confused an ambassador. (There are a few audio issues.)

 

WUSB 30TH ANNIVERSARY FEATURE

In 2007, we put together a bunch of features to celebrate the 30th anniversary of WUSB. This is the only surviving one, and it features an excerpt from an edition of "The Voice of Long Island" where pandemonium broke out over the air. (The full show is in our archives.)

 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON SHOW - SEPTEMBER 20, 1985

Oh yes, the Friday afternoon shows. I thought these had all been destroyed. This was the period in 1985 where I was into telling stories on the air about a fictitious town in the area and its assorted citizens. Nobody else was doing anything like that, right?

Stoneyhaven came about through the old Tripod Family serial that aired on the Voice of Long Island back in the 1980s. I expanded that world a bit and came up with a new story each week. On this first edition, aired on September 20, 1985, the subject matter included the start of school and the local newspaper. A good bit of the rest of the show is also included here.

 

INTERCOLLEGIATE BROADCASTING SYSTEM INTERVIEWS #1 - MARCH 1987

Each year (and to this day) the Intercollegiate Broadcasting System has a conference in New York City. These are some excerpts from March 1987, including: a brief interview with free form radio legend Vin Scelsa, who at the time was working for New York's K-ROCK under his own terms; a WUSB 10th anniversary ID by music critic Wayne Robbins; and a brief interview with IBS conference coordinator Jeff Tellis, who discusses some of the history behind this event.

 

BAFFIN ISLAND - TOONIK TYME, APRIL 1987

The first of a bunch of features from Baffin Island, a place I decided to go in April of 1987 when I became curious about what happened if you just kept driving north. It turns out you'd never get to Baffin Island since it was so far north you could only get there by plane. What I found was an incredible community in a place called Frobisher Bay (in the process of being renamed to Iqaluit to reflect its Inuit culture). I arrived just in time for an annual festival called Toonik Tyme, a brief recording of which is contained here.

 

WUSB ELECTION DAY REPORT - NOVEMBER 8, 1983

This is an unedited report from Tuesday, November 8, 1983 on Election Day, as newly elected County Legislator Steve Englebright is interviewed. Topics include the future of the Shoreham nuclear power plant, the southwest sewer district, property taxes, what to do about LILCO, and how Ferdinand Giese failed as the previous legislator for the area.

 

WUSB'S DEBUT ON THE FM DIAL - JUNE 27, 1977

On Monday, June 27, 1977, WUSB officially went on the air at 90.1FM. (The station had existed as a carrier current outlet at 820AM for a number of years prior.) This is the first half hour of that momentous broadcast day. Station Manager Norm Prusslin introduces the station. Also appearing are Dr. John S. Toll, president of the State University of New York at Stony Brook; Ishai Bloch, president of the Student Polity Association at Stony Brook; and  Richard Koch, program manager of WUSB. Controversies come up almost immediately, as well as a preview of what to look forward to. After some closing words from Norm, the official sign-on takes place, followed by a WUSB news promo and the "WUSB 5:42 News" with Paul Harris, Frank Burgert, and Dave Fink. Some of the news stories of the day include a vote to strike against the Long Island Railroad Saturday, protests against Caroline Kennedy getting a job at the New York Daily News, the fight for decriminalization of marijuana, and the future of "Star Wars" on television. An anti nuclear power Friends of the Earth PSA was also part of this broadcast, along with a sports report, a Chuck Mangione legal ID, and the beginning of the "WUSB Concert Series."

 

NPR'S "MORNING EDITION" PIECES (SPRING 1984)

In March of 1984, I was involved in the first year of 2600. I was also in the thick of a major hacking case involving a company called GTE Telenet. The FBI had raided WUSB and my friend's house because those were the two locations that I was connecting from (I had yet to have my own computer). After months of limbo, I was getting impatient and wanted the case to move forward. So after determining that half a year after the raids (October 1983), there had been no effort to improve security (the default password remained "A"), a friend and I visited Robert Krulwich over at National Public Radio to share the story with him. These "Morning Edition" pieces were the result. And shortly after they aired, I got the indictment I was pushing for.

 

THE SATURDAY NIGHT CIRCUS, 1977

While the practice newscast we posted two days ago was my first attempt to be a radio staffperson, it wasn't the first time I tried to be on the air. That distinction belongs to a beloved call-in show that aired in the early days of WUSB called "The Saturday Night Circus." It was alternately hosted by Ed Goldberg and Paul Harris. My friends and I would spend the night trying to get on the air and do something memorable or funny.

In the first excerpt (an Ed Goldberg episode dated October 15, 1977), my friend Al is doing a pretty good job talking about the recently argued Bakke case on affirmative action (the topic of the night), but, as was often the case, the call had ulterior motives and soon took a turn. Following that was my first-ever attempt, where I called myself "Star God" (seriously, WHAT was I thinking), went nowhere, but my second call was actually on topic. However, I was in the same house as my friend Al who had other plans and a phone extension. There are a bunch more calls included here.

The second excerpt is a Paul Harris episode dated October 22, 1977. His shows had a very different flavor and he tolerated less nonsense, as I was about to prove. My friend Al had an amazing conversation about Lenin, Stalin, Marx, and the Bolsheviks as parallels to The Beatles while I made a ridiculous argument about how driving faster was a great way to save gas (based on an actual argument a kid in one of my classes had made). I didn't make it very far.

NEW YORK CITY ANTI NUCLEAR ARMS MARCH - JUNE 12, 1982

Over the years, we've recorded all sorts of monumental events and talked to people from everywhere. Most of the time none of this makes it to air. On June 12, 1982, there was a huge march and rally against nuclear arms in New York City. My friend Sue wound up talking to a ton of people, far more than I had patience for. This is a nice sampling of the people in attendance.

 

IN THE BEGINNING...

Well, everything has to start somewhere, and this happens to be the very first recording of me attempting to be a member of the staff at WUSB. The assignment was to record a practice newscast at home. So here, I gave myself the on-air name of  E.G. Corley (what was I thinking) and read the sports for October 23, 1977. And somehow it wasn't bad enough to get asked to leave.